kids watching porn

3 Ways Porn is Finding Your Kids

Under many Christmas trees last year, kids found the latest and greatest electronics. I’ll be honest—the newest piece of technology is normally what I most get excited about. However, if you gave your kids iPads, Tablets, computers, or especially phones, then you probably know you opened a whole new world up to them. They have a ton of fun and interesting apps, games, and information at their fingertips. However, the devices also provide a gateway to your child for the outside world and that comes with danger and risk.

Some of the most dangerous predators in the world of tablets, iPads, and phones are purveyors of pornography, who are seeking to hook an entire new generation into addiction. The last thing we want is our kids watching porn. So before you give new devices to your kids, be prepared to protect them. But you can’t do that if you don’t know where they are vulnerable. Here are 3 ways pornographers can find your kids.

Everywhere

Porn can find our kids pretty much everywhere in our culture. That’s obvious. You name the technology and porn will be there. But did you know you can ask your Internet provider for a monthly report of all the sites visited from your IP address? That will tell you where your kids are going so you can talk about it. While the dangers of the web are well known, here are three you might not have considered.

Social Media

Although most social media platforms have rules and guidelines governing nudity and porn on their platforms, they aren’t quick enough or don’t care enough to eliminate it before it’s too late. All kids have to do is come across certain hashtags or follow a porn star and they are a click away from obscene material. Porn sites will send instant messages and friend requests from fake accounts to lure them in.

YouTube

Like social media apps, YouTube has porn guidelines and rules regarding content. However, porn videos are constantly uploaded anyway and YouTube is often too slow to keep up. Even when YouTube does take down a video, the user will not be banned and simply can upload the next video. Porn sites also leave links to their sites in comment sections. They hide pornographic content using thumbnails with Disney characters and other cartoons, which not only make their videos look appropriate but make them enticing to children. With a simple search for a Disney character, your child could be bombarded with pornographic content within seconds.

Text Messages

Without even requesting them, some phone owners receive web links to porn sites in text messages from unknown numbers. Predators send texts like this randomly. If your child has a device that has text messaging, this could happen. Talk to your child about not clicking on links from phone numbers they don’t recognize.

Protective Measures

Take all of the protective measures you can. Only let your kids use electronics in public spaces in your house. No electronics in their rooms. Get phone and tablet monitoring software like Bark (or any of the others). Get Netnanny or Covenant Eyes for your home Internet. The more you can filter, the better. However, here is a tough truth: If your kids want to find porn, they will (and most likely, they will be curious about it).

They also will probably be able to find a way to do it without your knowledge, even if you are vigilant. Even if your kids aren’t seeking it, porn peddlers are aggressive and crafty enough to figure out ways around software protection and website and app rules. That doesn’t mean we should surrender and accept defeat. It means you need to be as vigilant as possible in your protection efforts but understand your efforts will never be foolproof—not even close.

Your Best Hope

When it comes to pornography and your kids, the best protective measure you have is your relationship with them. Since your kids are being attacked with it from every angle, your ability to have real, raw, and vulnerable conversations with them is preeminent for their safety. You need to step into their world, listen and learn about their interests and friendships, and spend time making memories together. From your kid’s perspective, that will earn you the right to have difficult conversations. Take every opportunity to step into these uncomfortable discussions. Initiate the talk early and often. Helping your kids navigate through this minefield is your best hope.

Earn some points: Are you married? Share this iMOM article with your wife and discuss how to protect your kids from pornography: The Truth About Porn Moms Need To Know.

Sound off: What are some other ways to protect our kids from pornography?

Huddle up with your kids and ask, “Have you ever seen something on TV or online that made you feel uncomfortable?”

 


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